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This southern native has very narrow, needle-like leaves that line the stems like bottle brushes. Surprisingly, they are soft as silk to the touch. From late spring thru early summer, 2-3" wide clusters of small, light blue, star-shaped flowers are borne above the short mound of ferny foliage. After blooming, it quickly grows to reach a height of about 3 feet.

Amsonia adds a billowy, finely textured element to the landscape. It grows into a dense mass, much like a small shrub. The cool blue flowers can be useful in toning down adjacent flower colors.

The most valuable feature of A. hubrichtii is its fall color; the entire plant turns a stunning shade of golden yellow. It makes an excellent backdrop for fall-blooming perennials such as sedums and garden mums.

 

Amsonia thrives in most gardens with little care. It is low-maintenance, easy to grow and trouble-free. Plant it in full sun or partial shade and moist soil of average fertility. If grown in too much shade or very rich soil, its habit will be open and floppy. This plant grows fairly large but it will not need to be divided for many years. Cutting the stems back to within 6-8" of the ground after flowering will result in fuller growth.

 

Amsonia hubrichtii is native to fields and meadows in the midwest.  It can be found growing naturally in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri.

 

 From Walters Gardens website https://www.waltersgardens.com/variety.php?ID=AMSHU

Amsonia hubrichtii

SKU: 1779589398861
$8.00Price
  • Common Name Arkanasas Blue Star, Arkansas Amsonia
    Plant Type Perennial
    Zones 4-9
    Height 3'
    Spacing 3'
    Growth Habit Uprignt
    Growth Rate Rapid
    Bloom Time Late Spring-Early Summer
    Light
    Requirements

    Full Sun (>6 hrs. Direct Sun)

    Part Shade (4-6hrs Direct Sun

    Water Needs

    Average Water Needs

    Consistent Water Needs

    Soil Type

    Poor Soil Quality
    Average Soil Quality

    Animal
    Resistance
    Deer
    Tolerance Low maintenance
    Uses

    Borders

     Cut Foliage

    Focal Point

     Mass Planting

    Origin Native to North America
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